My Problem With Conspiracy Theories: A Christian Perspective

There was a time in my life when I was preoccupied with conspiracy theories. I believed that the church organization of which I am a member had been infiltrated by a secret order of evil men and that some of the members of this order were masquerading as leaders in my church. As a teenager, I devoured comic books and other materials that fed my conspiracy theory. I spent a lot of time and mental energy imagining how evil these people were and how I would go about “outing” them and exposing their evil machinations.

I’ve learned a few things in the years since my teenage obsession with conspiracy theories. First, I’ve concluded that some of what I believed back then probably isn’t true. And secondly, even if all my teenage conspiracy theories were true I’ve decided that it wouldn’t make much of a difference in my life anyway.

Most grand conspiracy theories are based on a great deal of speculation and not on any solid biblical (or other) evidence.

Whether or not the Illuminati or some other secret order have actually infiltrated and are controlling churches or governments today is a matter of at least some speculation. Some of it may be true. But a lot of the information upon which these theories are based is conjectural and circumstantial in nature. One thing is certain, these theories are not based on the Bible, for the Bible says nothing about the Illuminati pulling the strings on world events or controlling the world.

In fact, the Bible specifically tells us to avoid speculative issues, myths and questions that engender strife. Paul writes, “But avoid foolish questions, and genealogies, and contentions, and strivings about the law; for they are unprofitable and vain.” (Titus 3:9, emphasis mine). “…[Do not] pay attention to myths and endless genealogies, which give rise to mere speculation rather than furthering the administration of God which is by faith.” (1 Timothy 1:4). Almost every grand-scale conspiracy theory, generally based on a great deal of speculation, fits within what these verses are talking about.

But let’s say that we could prove without a doubt that the world is controlled by the Illuminati. As a Christian, what practical difference would that make in my life or your life? Would we go into hiding? Try to assassinate those evil leaders? Spend our time focused on exposing their evil plans?

Or would we keep doing what we’re supposed to be doing anyway – loving our enemies like Jesus tells us to do and praying for evil doers while spreading the gospel?

Ultimately, grand conspiracy theories lead to an unhealthy fascination and preoccupation with things that are less than certain and direct our attention away from loving our enemies and spreading the gospel as Jesus told us to do.

Conspiracy theories give evil people too much credit and attribute too much power to them.

Think about it. Most grand conspiracy theories give a lot of credit to evil men, teaching that those men – most of them Freemasons or members of the Illuminati – are controlling the world. Really? Is that what the Bible teaches? Not exactly.

In fact, the Bible teaches that God is the one who controls the affairs of the governments of this world. He is the one who determines who will rule the world, not a bunch of evil men.

Speaking of this, notice what the Bible says:

“And he changeth the times and the seasons: he removeth kings, and setteth up kings: he giveth wisdom unto the wise, and knowledge to them that know understanding…” Daniel 2:21.

“For promotion cometh neither from the east, nor from the west, nor from the south. But God is the judge: he putteth down one, and setteth up another.” Psalm 75:6-7.

So the Bible says that God, not any group of men, is responsible for who comes to power in our world. To give evil men the credit goes directly against what the Bible teaches.

Additionally, focusing on the supposed power of some men in a smoke-filled room somewhere ultimately leads us to exalt these evil men to a demigod status with power akin to that of God himself.

Conspiracy theories about the government and church leadership cause us to distrust God-appointed authorities.

Granted, some political leaders are unquestionably evil. A good example was the Emperor Nero who lived during Paul’s time. Yet, do we see Paul railing on Nero’s evilness? Hardly. In fact, we hear nothing from Paul that could be construed as disrespect toward Nero. Paul had bigger fish to fry, namely spreading the gospel to the world and helping prepare people to meet God. What Nero did was largely irrelevant to the grander scheme of things and Paul knew that.

In Romans 13 the Bible calls the civil authorities “ministers of God” appointed by Him to keep the peace. Paul also commands that Christians should respect and “honor” the authorities to the extent that we can do so without disobeying God (see Romans 13:1-7 and Acts 5:29).

Grand conspiracy theories teach the opposite. Instead of respecting civil authorities, conspiracy theorists teach that political leaders should be, at the least, distrusted and that they are not the “ministers of God” but are rather the ministers of Satan. Those embracing these theories would do well to heed the example of David when his men encouraged him to take the life of King Saul in the cave (see 1 Samuel 24:10). There, instead of taking the life of the evil king who was pursuing him, David refused to lay a hand upon the “Lord’s anointed” and instead showed respect to this evil man and spared his life.

By embracing conspiracy theories Christians are led to engage in slander and bear false witness against their neighbor.

As noted above, some leaders are undeniably evil and others are open and avowed enemies of God and his people. To state these objective facts about such an individual is not slanderous. However, to speculate and say that a certain government leader is a member of an evil secret organization (or to make other similar allegations) when there is less than certain proof that such is the case is to bear false witness against that person and to slander them.

Bearing false witness against our neighbor is sin (Exodus 20:16). Slandering is also prohibited in the Bible. “Do not go about spreading slander among your people. I am the Lord.” Leviticus 19:16, NIV. Furthermore, the Bible tells us to speak about things that will build each other up (“edify”) and stop speaking about the things that tear others down. Notice Paul’s words to the inhabitants of the evil city of Ephesus: “Let no corrupt communication proceed out of your mouth, but that which is good to the use of edifying, that it may minister grace unto the hearers. And grieve not the holy Spirit of God, whereby ye are sealed unto the day of redemption. Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour, and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice: And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.” Eph. 4:29-32.

Notice how serious of a sin in God’s sight is the sin of evil speaking – Paul tells us that we can grieve the Holy Spirit by speaking words of this kind.

Focusing on conspiracy theories takes our eyes off of Jesus and could cause us to be deceived at the end of time.

The Bible teaches a principle of natural law: we become what we look at (see 2 Cor. 3:18). If we look at something long enough that thing, person or idea begins to affect us. (Think about the stories of cops tasked with infiltrating a criminal organization only to become “dirty” themselves. They began to change because of what surrounded them). If we feast long enough on conspiracy theories and the evils they encompass there is a danger that we will become enamored with the evil and take our focus off of Jesus.

Instead, we ought to be focusing on Jesus. John the Apostle admonishes us to “behold what manner of love the Father has bestowed upon us” (1 John 3:1). “Behold” (focus on; think about) the love of God, John says, not the bad actions of evil people in this world.

Notice what Ellen White had to say about focusing on what she calls the seductive arts of Satan:

“Give the people present truth. Talk the truth. Fill their minds with truth. Build up the strongholds of truth. And do not bring Satan’s theories to minds that should not hear in regard to them. What the people need is not a representation of the seductive arts of Satan, but a presentation of the truth as it is in Jesus. Remember that the devil can be served by a repetition of his lies. The less we handle these objectionable subjects, the purer, cleaner, and less tainted will be our minds and our principles….” Evangelism, p. 624, emphasis mine.

Finally, Ellen White notes, “Resolve never, never to repeat error, but always to teach the truth. Fill hearts and minds with the solemn, sacred truth for this time.” Evangelism, p. 623.

The end-time movement to enforce worship is a democratic movement, not top secret behind-the-scenes maneuvering by a few evil politicians.

Ultimately, there is one grand conspiracy theory that the Bible indicates is true. That conspiracy theory is that Satan, the master deceiver and enemy of all that is good, is conspiring with and using sinful men to overthrow God and His people. The last book of the Bible details Satan’s titanic struggle with Christ to overthrow God’s government in the universe. That struggle will culminate in the Battle of Armageddon – the last battle between Christ and Satan. Satan will ultimately lose the war.

The Bible gives us some clues as to who Satan will use and conspire with at the end of time. First, there is the Antichrist power, a human organization, also referred to as the “Beast” in Revelation 13. Then there is a second “Beast” in Revelation 13 – referring to a nation that the devil works through in his attempt to control the world at the end of time. Through both of these powers Satan will seek to defeat God and His end-time people.

Surprisingly, to some, the end time movements to enact and enforce laws leading to the biblical “Mark of the Beast” will not primarily be stealth movements based on secret conspiracies. In fact, it seems that they will be very public and enacted by a democratic society and due to the popular demand of the citizens of that society. Notice that the second beast of Revelation 13 says “to them that dwell on the earth, that they should make an image to the beast, which had the wound by a sword, and did live.” Revelation 13:14, emphasis mine. As Ellen White notes, this action denotes a grassroots-based, democratic movement that eventually leads to the enacting of laws that result in the Mark of the Beast. (“…Rulers and legislators, in order to secure public favor, will yield to the popular demand for a law enforcing Sunday observance.” The Great Controversy, p. 592.). According to Revelation, it’s the people who are ostensibly pulling the strings at the end of time – not a few evil men in a smoke-filled room somewhere. Of course, even during this tumultuous time, God will still be ultimately in control.

Quite contrary to this, most grand conspiracy theories about the end of time teach that a few evil men are plotting to spring laws on the United States or the world and that one day we will suddenly wake up to a dictatorship that has been going on all along behind the scenes without our knowledge.

The Bible tells us what we need to know and do to stand through the end of time. One thing we should not be doing is closely studying into conspiracy theories that are speculative and based on theories of men. Instead, we should put on the full spiritual armor of God so that we can stand against the ultimate conspirator – the Devil himself.

Paul sums it up for us by letting us know how we can “stand” in these last days. Finally, be strong in the Lord and in his mighty power. Put on the full armor of God, so that you can take your stand against the devil’s schemes. For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms. Therefore put on the full armor of God, so that when the day of evil comes, you may be able to stand your ground, and after you have done everything, to stand. Stand firm then, with the belt of truth buckled around your waist, with the breastplate of righteousness in place, and with your feet fitted with the readiness that comes from the gospel of peace. In addition to all this, take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming arrows of the evil one. Take the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God.” Eph. 6:10-17.

Evil people, i.e., “flesh and blood,” are not the enemy. The enemy is the Devil and his demons. Every soul – government officials and members of secret organizations included – is a candidate for receiving the gospel of peace. Our mission is to put on the whole spiritual armor and to reach them with the urgency and love that accompanies God’s end time message. Don’t let yourself be distracted from the mission.

(I am indebted to a paper written by Pastor Lary Brown, president of the Sri Lanka Mission of Seventh-day Adventists, which inspired some of the thoughts expressed here).

Stephen N. Allred is lead pastor of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Yuba City, CA. Follow him on Twitter at @allredesq

Advertisements

19 thoughts on “My Problem With Conspiracy Theories: A Christian Perspective

  1. I agree with this. In some respects it might be too late. Conspiracy believers are passionate believers and cannot b e dissuaded.

  2. Dear Sacredconscience,
    Thanks for that, I think the problem is that “conspiracy theories” are defined as things that work with anomalies and somewhat outlandish induction rather than positive evidence that can be falsified or even verified empirically. Also, I think by this point 9/11 deniers have done so much lying, fudging of the facts, quoting out of context, and other assorted asshattery that they’re simply not even trying to be taken seriously. They’ve become a band of circled wagons, assuring each other that they hold “the secret truth” that they alone are privy to, and that anyone who dares raise a dissenting question is one of those billions of evil, treacherous, curious outsiders.
    Kindest Regards

  3. Hi Steve,

    Some other thoughts about why we fall for these things:

    1. We get off the hook and can blame the problems around us on “forces too big and too bad”.

    2. Simplistic answers to complex problems seem reassuring to us; whereas complex problems that don’t have easy answers overwhelm us and can make us fatalistic.

    3. The idea that everything fits into “us and them” categories puts us in the center of importance–It can be a very heady view of reality for little people. Without this perspective, I and my viewpoints don’t matter to the “dark forces out there,” no monster is chasing me and my little world is meaningless.

    Having said all that, the Bible is perfectly clear that there is a grand conspiracy–it is the great controversy between Christ and Satan. Satan does have his agents and we may very well be one of them if we aren’t surrendered to Jesus. Yes, “big, bad forces” may be concocting something, but without the love of Jesus in our souls, we are a part of this darkness.

    Blessings to you!

    Betsy

    1. This is very nicely worded. On the one hand, I can agree with the writer when he implies conspiracy theories are for fools. Conspiracy theorists embrace the speculative and unseen, the unfalsifiable, and are prone to the type of sensationalistic sentiments which arouse intense emotions–be it fear or otherwise.

      On the other hand, the irony of this piece of writing is that the writer disregards one type of myth while simultaneously embracing another. One cannot ask for the disregard of things that are “less than certain”, ie without proper evidence and in the same breath talk about a deity whose existence is “less than certain”.

      I am sure I will ruffle feathers and be blasted in a comment section such as this, but my point is not to ruffle feathers, but to get you all to ask yourself the most serious questions. What are you doing, and do you apply the same standard you seek here to the faith that you have? How much are you really willing to learn? How is believing in a myth, story, conspiracy theory, legend, superstition, any different from believing in a deity? Do you hold yourself and your deity to the same evidence based standard? Do you even know the history of the deity you believe in? Conspiracy theorists believe in their theories with the same heated fervor as many fervent theistic believers. Indeed, those who question other conspiracy theorists and theories are seen as not being enlightened enough, not having enough strength, not having enough faith, not having enough wisdom. I urge you all to ask yourself these questions without the veil of pretention, without the reflexive responses that come with years of indoctrination. I urge you to think and speak your own words, ask yourself your own questions.

      As far as this article goes, let’s examine just a few instances of cognitive dissonance appearing here:

      1)”Ultimately, there is one grand conspiracy theory that is true. That conspiracy theory is that Satan, the master deceiver and enemy of all that is good, is conspiring with and using sinful men to overthrow God and His people”

      – Using the evidence based reasoning purported at the top of the article, where is the non-biblical evidence that any of that statement is at all true? History books do not count as evidence, faith or belief is also not evidence (if you are being truly honest with yourself), as wisely described by the writer in the article. Also, how can all the “grand” conspiracy theories be likely false, but the grandest conspiracy theory of them all be ultimately true?

      2)”As noted above, some leaders are undeniably evil and others are open and avowed enemies of God and his people. To state these objective facts about such an individual is not slanderous.”

      – The idea of objective evil or objective good is an extremely hazy topic. One can say God is objectively good, so by extension whatever he says is good is indeed objectively good, and whatever he says is evil is objectively evil. However, how can one being dictating what is good and what is not good give rise to true objectivity? On the contrary, it is entirely subjective. In reality, good and evil are not black and white, binary propositions. There is almost an infinite amount of gray area which can be subject to interpretation and circumstance. Either something is objective, or it is not objective. Truly objective ideas are not created or defined by any being, even a deity.

      3)”So the Bible says that God, not any group of men, is responsible for who comes to power in our world. To give evil men the credit goes directly against what the Bible teaches. Additionally, focusing on the supposed power of some men in a smoke-filled room somewhere ultimately leads us to exalt these evil men to a demigod status with power akin to that of God himself.”

      – Well, men in a smoke-filled room controlling or affecting the happenings of the world is nothing new, nor is it a conspiracy in and of itself. It has been happening for centuries upon centuries upon millennia. The men who have the military and financial power have the greatest effect on what happens in this world. Think of Alexander. Think of Napoleon. Think of Rome, Greece, Persia, Mongolia. Think of Hitler. The Vatican. The Inquisition. The Crusades. Martyrdom. The list goes on and on. The second part of that I want to address is that the writer quotes the Bible saying God is ultimately responsible for who comes to power in this world. Look at the above list, which is not at all comprehensive, think of the infinite and incalculable amount of pain and suffering that has resulted to many millions, if not many billions of people over time.

      Lastly, consider the scientific, and scholarly evidence. If you are in a scholarly bubble, leave that bubble. Examine the true roots of your own beliefs through scholarly methods. Consider reading “A History of God” by Karen Armstrong, as a starting point. Ponder the universe with untainted glasses. I say all this to you not to dissuade you from believing in whatever you believe in, or to convince you of my beliefs. (You may have noticed I have not given voice to my beliefs). On the contrary, I wish for you all to achieve greater enlightenment in whatever avenue you pursue, to hold the same standards of excellence to anything you examine. Know yourself, and really try and understand what you think you know. Don’t fall for logical fallacies. Examine everything. I will not reply further on this thread to any comments, as I do not wish to get into an argument. My only goal is to give rise to meaningful questions.

      Good luck.

      1. In reply to the anonymous commenter above I would note that this piece was written from the standpoint of someone who has chosen to believe in God and in the Bible. The “evidence” relied upon to make the choice to place my faith in the Bible and the God of the Bible is not the subject of this article and nor do I attempt to defend that choice in the article. As such, my discussion of a grand conspiracy theory supported by the Bible is not logically inconsistent with my premise since, to me, the Bible is a solid evidentiary base upon which to build my conclusions.

  4. Wonderful Job Steve! I will be sharing this! Please keep up the good work. I especially love how you bring out that consipiracy theories give credit to men instead of God’s power. Jesus tells us in Matthew 24 that the end of the world will come after the church preaches the gospel into all the world. Masons and Jesuits don’t bring about end time events. God and His church does.

  5. Thank you so much for this article. I will share this and commit some of the bibical texts to memory. I needed to hear some common sense regarding these conspiracy theories.

    1. Eph. 5:11 And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove them.
      Eph. 5:12 For it is a shame even to speak of those things which are done of them in secret.

      “Give the people present truth. Talk the truth. Fill their minds with truth. Build up the strongholds of truth. And do not bring Satan’s theories to minds that should not hear in regard to them. What the people need is not a representation of the seductive arts of Satan, but a presentation of the truth as it is in Jesus. Remember that the devil can be served by a repetition of his lies. The less we handle these objectionable subjects, the purer, cleaner, and less tainted will be our minds and our principles….” Evangelism, p. 624

  6. As you know, Steve, I have at least distantly followed your journey…and I’m more than gratified by the precious insights you currently share…you have a unique grasp of “both sides” of Adventism that is now being used to bless, strengthen, and truly fortify many for the Final Crises! Blessings!!

  7. Steve, I was so surprised and pleased to find out who the author of this excellent article is – you! God is obviously using you powerfully to make a clear distinction between issues of panic and issues or eternal consequence. Your journey is one I am delighted to observe, and your contribution to ministry, as well as InMinistry, will and is making a difference for the kingdom of Heaven. Blessings, my friend,

  8. Bless you! Bless you for this article! This is the clearest treatment of the dangers of conspiracy theories that I have read. There are f & f who are obsessed with this issue and carry a dark and heavy cloud around them that is difficult to be with.
    Bless you for putting the focus back onto our all powerful God and Father.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s